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First day nerves... and that's the teacher!

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  • First day nerves... and that's the teacher!

    How do you introduce yourself to a new class when on supply? It happens almost every time we walk into a classroom. How do you go about making the 'right' impression straight away? We know it's important to set the boundaries, but, when you can't put names to faces, and aren't sure where to find the , let alone the multi-link cubes... where do you start? :?

  • #2
    It's harder when they don't have to wait outside to be let in by you. I sometimes start by making them go outside again to wait and enter properly, if they're an unruly class. Sure it's against some school rules tho.

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    • #3
      Say Good morning really loudly when they walk in and introduce yourseld and set your ground rules. Say your not your usual teacher so you might do some things different today. I got to admit i sometimes forget 2 tell them my name, then later in the day I get what's your name? You didn't tell us your name a 100 times.

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      • #4
        I make sure I write my name on the board when I write the date up, before they come in, though I suppose I should really make sure I introduce myself properly incase they can't read it!

        I tend to write a non-confrontational message up too... Good Morning Year 5, don't forget to put your coats on when you go out to play as it's cold outside! Or something similar, most kids try and read what you've put, especially if there's a stuck in there somewhere. For some of them, it's the only thing they really try to read all day!

        I'm thinking that maybe it's too familiar though, in new classes, as I do find it difficult in some schools to get them settled for the register.

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        • #5
          I'm teaching a new class tomorrow in a brand new school and I want to give a good impression. I always write my name on the board with a smiley face (for great children who deserve stickers), the numbers 1, 2, 3 (for not so great children who need warnings before being sent out/missing break etc. - sometimes I don't even need this so I just mention it), table points chart and the timetable for the day - the kids love rubbing the lessons off as the day goes by and so do I! As the kids come in I often say hello and introduce myself individually whilst catching their names (it's always good to refer to one child by their name e.g. "Sam helped me this morning as he came him so he's already on my smiley face board!" Then the other kids are dying to do the same). If I can get a word in edgeways I introduce myself to the whole class as an experienced teacher and to be treated exactly the same as their normal teacher. Then I explain rewards and sanctions. It all depends on the class really and the vibe you get off them in the first few mins. If they are roudy I would count down from 10 or 5 and then say "give me 5" - If they don't shut up, time them and take it off game time/break or whatever!

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          • #6
            I usually write my name on the board before they come in and when they're all settled, I say "Hello everyone, i'm Miss ....., my names on the board in case you forget. I've been told that this is the best class in the school, so i'm very lucky today, aren't I!"

            I was gutted yesterday when I was teaching a Year 1 class as a little girl came up to me and said one of her friends was upset because she was scared of me and wanted her real teacher. I nodded, and made sure I was the happiest, friendliest teacher that I could be. I started off by saying "Hello everyone! Is everybody feeling happy today? I'm going to be your teacher this afternoon, and we are going to have a GREAT time." All this said with a Disney smile!

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            • #7
              I know how you feel - I did an after-school club this week, and half way through, one of Reception started ing "when's my mummy coming to get me?" Oh, bless!

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              • #8
                I introduce myself and ask the children to make eye contact when I call their name on the register, so that I can put a name to their face. Most children co-operate with this, some point at the child and others even at me! This system teaches me their names quickly and establishes that the children's names are important. These days, I find some children answer with 'yeah', so I repeat the name until they answer properly. At the end of the register, I write the names of children, on the whiteboard, who settled quickly, answered clearly, sat properly and so on. If there is a dinner register, I ask children what they would like, rather than, "What do you want?"

                Is it just me, but I CANNOT get rid of these emoticons and I find them very irritating? What is the purpose of them?

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                • #9
                  Wow, these s are so useful, thank you everybody!!

                  I really like Clarabelle's of giving smileys right from the word go so that all the children are interested.

                  I had a Year 1 class the other day who we quite chatty all through the day. They weren't awful but it was the sort of level where I could get the to stop and look at me using a clap pattern or a tambourine but the minute I started telling them what I needed to do they were chatting again. I ended up repeating the clap patterns several times and I think that made them less effective. We ended up missing some of playtime cuz they were so slow to tidy up but that didn't seem to phase them at all and some of them had already lost huge amounts of golden time earlier in the week so there wasn't much else to take away from them. The only time they were really quiet was when I was reading a story, which makes me think sometimes you just have to get going with something so they have something to listen to, rather than continuing to wait for their silence.

                  Any tips on returning to a class after a few weeks? Especially a class like this one who pushed it a little last time?

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                  • #10
                    Also - Hectare: I think you can disable emoticons in text underneath your post, before you submit it. there should be a tick box with that option.

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                    • #11
                      Yes, I have already 'ticked' the no emoticon button.

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                      • #12
                        Talk to them right from the beginning about what you're going to do today... using your story voice! Write / draw on the board as you're saying it all, get them to give you s for what you're going to draw to remind them it's PE etc. If they're quiet when you're telling a story.... tell them the story of their day! Use this throughout the day too, and get them to take turns to remind you what's happening next...

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                        • #13
                          One of the most effective ways, which ties in with what's been said in earlier posts, is to reinforce the behaviour you want right from the start. Lots of praise for the first pupils to follow an instruction, like stop, please, & listen. Lots of praise for good contributions to discusions. Having a seating plan (which pupils can help you draw up at the start of the lesson) lets you put names to faces & target praise & deal with off target pupils quickly. It also doesn't hurt to be generous with housepoints, smiley stickers & other positive rewards. And the promise of a good mention in despatches to the class teacher on her/his return may motivate some too. These tips are more aimed at KS1 & 2 than secondary age pupils.

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                          • #14
                            I tend to deal with things as they come. I don't remind them of the rules unless it is really needed or a child mentions them. I find out what is planned for the day and stick to the children's routine as much as possible. You can normally tell which children will be a problem when they come into the class. I tend to talk to these children about anything, join in their conversation like you have always been there.
                            Classroom routines tend to run smoothly and children will normally known what they are doing or should be doing. Sometimes I don't even tell them my name. I just get on with what they need to do. Give them instructions first if children ask what my name is i tell them but not the whole class.

                            The unknown is sometimes an advantage and children will not want to risk playing up as they are unsure how you will react.

                            Children like to help and I always ask children to do things in the class.

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